© 2015 by Athenaeum21

March 1, 2019

Client: Oxford University IT Services & Humanities Division

Project Phase 1: Functional Requirements for a Sustainable Digital Humanities Infrastructure (2018)

In 2018, Athenaeum21 carried out an in-depth analysis of the functional requirements of Digital Humanities (DH) projects at the University of Oxford, including extensive interviews with DH project leads, followed by technical and functional analysis for more than 30 DH projects. Our charge, from the university’s IT department and Division of Humanities, was to help the University to design and more sustainable infrastructure for the DH projects. Our research uncovered a more robust and detailed picture of how both active and retired DH projects differ from the most common research data management and preservation models, and of their unique technical sustainability and preservation issues. In response to these diverse needs, we propose a layered service model for creating a sustainable digital hu...

October 30, 2018

Many universities are facing difficult choices about how to sustain, preserve, and/or archive their (often) hundreds of digital humanities (DH) projects that have reached the conclusion of their funding or support. In 2018, Athenaeum21 carried out an in-depth analysis of the functional requirements of DH projects at the University of Oxford. This included extensive interviews with DH project leads, followed by technical and functional analysis for more than 30 DH projects.

Our research has uncovered a more robust and detailed picture of how both active and retired DH projects differ from the most common research data management and preservation models, and of their unique technical sustainability and preservation issues. In response to these diverse needs, we propose a layered service model for creating a sustainable digital humanities technology infrastructure. Breaking down the functional requirements into “layers” acknowledges the differing life cyc...

February 19, 2018

Athenaeum21 is pleased to announce the publication of the article  "Contextualizing library assessment within a broader ecosystem: Proposed models for linking the strategic to the micro" in the most recent issue of Performance Measurement and Metrics. The article is based on the presentation of the same name at the 2017 International Conference on Performance Management in Libraries in Oxford, UK. Between 2015 and 2017, Athenaeum21 co-founders Christine Madsen and Megan Hurst conducted 96 interviews with research library directors and leaders, library assessment practitioners, and academic experts on four continents about library assessment and its current state in their institutions. The research was funded by the Association of Research Libraries and the Mellon Foundation. A portion of the research was conducted in collaboration with University of California, Davis; University of Oxford; and University of Goettingen.

The article shares "the lessons l...

December 6, 2016

Athenaeum21's Dr Christine Madsen presented "The Future of Finding at the University of Oxford" at December's Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) meeting in Washington, DC, along with Catriona Cannon, Deputy Librarian & Keeper of Collections at the Bodleian Libraries, of the University of Oxford.

Dr Madsen works at the intersection of cultural heritage and technology and is expert in building large-scale systems that use technology to connect researchers, teachers, and students with library and learning resources. She is co-founder and principal of Athenaeum21 Consulting, where she works with libraries and museums around the world on digital strategy and innovation.

Good resource discovery tools are not simply about making research easier and faster, but about facilitating the creation, preservation and discovery of knowledge by enabling new modes of research, especially across disciplines. In 2014 the University of Oxford began a program of activ...

February 8, 2016

Athenaeum21 Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer, Christine Madsen, was recently interviewed by  Sense About Science for their feature Epistemically Challenged- a series about how each one of us explores knowledge. Madsen talks about the role of communication in academia and the need for researchers and scholars not only to be good at something, but to be able to communicate what they do and explain why it is important to people outside their domains.

 

"Part of learning any trade, or becoming an expert in anything, should be about communicating what you do to other people."

 

Read the full interview: http://www.senseaboutscienceusa.org/epistemically-challenged-christine-madsen/

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